10 Helpful Herbal Tinctures to Keep Around

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Tinctures are easy – easy to make, easy to use. (Learn how to make herbal tinctures here.) Many, many herbs tincture well – let's take a look at some that are good to tincture and keep on hand for common ailments.

Here are 10 helpful herbal tinctures to keep around for common ailments!

Echinacea tincture is often used at the onset of minor illnesses, such as the common cold, to prevent or shorten the duration of the illness. Echinacea tincture is also used as a sore throat spray.

Garlic tincture is used to treat a wide range of minor illnesses. Garlic is antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral. The tincture is used to treat conditions that range from inflammation to the common cold. When using an oil-based garlic tincture, store the tincture in the refrigerator immediately and discard after one week.

Chamomile is a traditional remedy for sleeplessness and headaches, and is often used to relieve stress. Chamomile tincture is also used to lessen pain, including the pain of menstrual cramps and headaches.

Like chamomile, lavender is a natural stress-reliever that is used to relieve and enhance feelings of well-being. Lavender promotes restful sleep and promotes relaxation during times of stress.

Calendula tincture is applied topically to minor cuts and scrapes to promote fast healing. The tincture can be applied directly to the wound, or added to a cream-based salve.

Rosemary tincture contains antioxidants and helps reduce inflammation in the body. Used internally, rosemary helps eliminate free radicals, reduces restlessness and promotes restful sleep. Rosemary tincture also reduces the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.

Peppermint tincture is a useful addition to the medicine cabinet, as the herb is used to treat indigestion and other common stomach ailments. Peppermint tincture is also applied topically to treat mild headaches, and relieves minor muscle aches when applied topically.

Ginger is a warming herb that reduces inflammation in the body and increases circulation. Ginger tincture promotes healthy digestion and is used to treat nausea, chills and congestion. Taken internally, the tincture relieves digestive issues such as gas and bloating.

Angelica tincture is not recommended for pregnant women, but the herb offers a wide range of benefits for others. Angelica root is an analgesic that relieves pain, and angelica tincture is traditionally use to treat headaches. Angelica root tincture is used to encourage proper urination and to treat upper respiratory infections.

Traditionally, lemon balm tincture is used to treat depression, and is thought to relieve stress and enhance feelings of well-being. Lemon balm is an antiviral that is used to treat viral infections, including cold sores, and to treat the flu and other viral illnesses.

10 herbal tinctures to keep on hand for common ailments!

Have you ever made herbal tinctures? What do you like to keep on hand?

Wildcraft herbs as much as you can! You can also buy herbs to make your own herbal tinctures at Mountain Rose Herbs. ♥





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Kylie Worthington is an herbalist, wellness educator, and mother passionate about equipping women to approach health holistically in a modern, mechanical world. She founded Everblossom to serve as a resource for healthy, meaningful, balanced living.

10 Responses

  1. I am really interested in learning more about tinctures. I would love to use natural remedies instead of the medicines that have so many side effects.

  2. john hutchens

    I like making a tincture from cottonwood buds. It really helps with aches and pains.

  3. Brittany Thomas

    Great list! I’ve yet to get into tinctures but I need to!

  4. Thank you for sharing your top 10 tinctures. I would love to use and make my own. I see you also have a link on learning how to make them, I’m heading over there.

  5. Patty Fick

    I love your website and all off this helpful information. I’ve bookmarked the tintures to save so I can give them a try. Thank you!!

  6. Good list, these are the standbys!

  7. I always keep echinacea on hand for infections and bug bites. Plus I have ginger in the winter to keep me warm. cayenne I keep all the time ( I love putting the cayenne in my lemonade). cascara sagrada I like to keep on hand for the bowels, elecampane, for an expectorant, and mullein I like to keep in the winter as well. I am going to make a bitter, to help with digestion very soon. I LOVE TINCTURING!

  8. Alieshaw Nelson

    I’ve heard that when you make tintures you just put a couple drops under the tongue. Do you also put them topically? Just put a couple of drops onto the wound, or afflicted area

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